Monthly Archives: April 2009

Pan Fried Bison Liver

With spring onions, sage and bone marrow demi-glace..

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See this post for more info and another recipe

Soak peeled, deveined and sliced bison liver overnight in fresh milk in a non-reactive container.

Fry sliced green onions and fresh sage in clarified butter with a little olive oil in a heavy skillet over medium heat.  Use a slotted spoon to transfer to a side dish and keep warm.

Lightly coat slices of liver in finely milled unbleached flour seasoned with salt, smoked black pepper and paprika and sear quickly on both sides in the same pan that the onions were cooked in, using additional butter as needed.  The liver should be golden brown on the outside, but no more than medium rare on the inside.  Transfer to a side dish and keep warm.

Melt finely diced bone marrow in the same pan.  Add beef stock and reduce quickly until thick and shiny.

Return liver to the pan and heat through.  Serve topped with fried onions and season with additional S&P to taste.

Grass-fed Bison from Thunder Heart provides nutrient dense, low fat, low cholesterol meat with as many Omega-3s per serving as salmon, and three to six times the amount of omega-3s as grain fed animals.

It contains the highest-known levels of the fat-blocker and anti-carcinogen, CLA (conjugated linolaic acid). Research on CLA is showing evidence that CLA has the potential to reduce the risk of cancer, obesity, diabetes, and a number of immune disorders.

It also has high concentrations of selenium, a natural trace element that acts as a mood elevator. The original “happy meal”. In research conducted by Dr. Martin Marchello at the Carrington Research Extension Center, grass fed Bison was determined to contain as much as four times more selenium than grain fed Bison.

Grass-fed Bison contains four times the amount of vitamin E found in grain fed beef. It is also a rich source of the vitamin beta-carotene, a vital antioxidant which reduces the risk of cancer by preventing cell degeneration.

Are Factory Farms Also Spreading Deadly Flu?

I don’t know.  But do you really think that these people have one shred of reverence for God’s creation?

“America’s top pork producer churns out a sea of waste that has destroyed rivers, killed millions of fish and generated one of the largest fines in EPA history. Welcome to the dark side of the other white meat..”

“…Despite years of warnings by public interest organizations such as the Organic Consumers Association and the Humane Society of the U.S., new evidence indicates drugged-out animals on intensive confinement factory farms are incubating deadly viruses that could set off a deadly epidemic.

A dangerous and rapidly spreading strain of influenza, which combines genetic material from pigs, birds and humans in a way researchers have not seen before, has killed over 150 people in Mexico, infecting thousands, and has spread to over a dozen countries, including the United States.

The World Health Organization warned early this week that the outbreak could reach global pandemic levels and raised the threat level to 4 (with 6 being the highest pandemic alert level). The last major global pandemic, the 1918 flu epidemic, killed 20-50 million people.

Despite company denials, a number of Mexican and U.S. news outlets are pointing to Virginia-based Smithfield Foods, the world’s largest pig producer ($11 billion in annual sales), as a likely (unconfirmed) source of the deadly outbreak. Smithfield sells pork and operates massive hog-raising operations in 40 nations, including Perote, Mexico, in the state of Vera Cruz, where the outbreak originated. For months, local residents and workers in Mexico have complained of pollution, contamination, and illnesses from the Smithfield plant. For years, Smithfield has been criticized in the United States for polluting rural communities, endangering public health, and exploiting workers and farmers.

CAFOs, such as Smithfield, feed pigs massive amounts of antibiotics, resulting in swine incubating and spreading antibiotic-resistant pathogens. These antibiotic-resistant pathogens are considered a major human health hazard by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. Given these serious public health concerns, a number of health and safety organizations have called for limits or bans on the use of antibiotics in livestock farming including the American Public Health Association, American Medical Association, Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Union of Concerned Scientists…”

Dead piles are a constant presence in factory farms. While pigs are fed massive amounts of antibiotics to keep them alive in conditions that would otherwise kill them, hundreds of thousands succumb to the stress of violent mutilations and intensive confinement. Dead pigs are sent to rendering plants, where they are made into dog and cat food or into feed that will be given to pigs, chickens, and other farmed animals.

Please take action today

Chana Masala with Raisin Chutney

A vegetarian dish of chana dal, yams, fresh coriander, onions, spices and raisin chutney..

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Rinse, pick over and soak chana dal overnight in filtered water with a tablespoon of whey.

Cook rinsed basmati rice in a 4:1 water to rice ratio in an open pan.  Cover and keep warm.

Meanwhile, sauté diced yam in ghee until soft.  Add dal and continue to cook until golden brown.

Add the sliced white part of a large spring onion and a tablespoon or two of a masala containing black pepper, curry leaf, coriander, cumin, cardamom, bay leaf, ginger, cloves and mustard seeds.  Continue to cook until onions are browned.

Add a volume of water equal to 1/2 that of the vegetables and continue to cook, stirring often, until the water is absorbed and the dal is tender.

Add the sliced green tops of the spring onion and a handful of chopped coriander leaves.

Stir to combine and serve over rice.  Dress with raisin chutney and garnish with nigella seeds and additional coriander.

Lamb Merguez Sausage Pizza

Spicy lamb merguez sausage, fresh tomatoes, harissa, spring onions, toasted pine nuts and haloumi (sheep’s milk cheese) on a thick focaccia..

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Lightly toast raw pine nuts in a dry skillet and set aside.

Increase heat and quickly sear slices of merguez with garlic and the white part of a spring onion. Set aside to drain.

Add chopped tomatoes and cook until most of the water is gone.  Add harissa to taste.

Drizzle focaccia with a little olive oil then spread the tomato sauce from the center to the outside of the crust.

Arrange pieces of sausage and slices of cheese over the sauce and sprinkle on pine nuts, green onion tops and chopped parsley.

Bake on a preheated pizza stone in a 400 degree oven until cheese just begins to brown.