Tag Archives: Real Food

Rally For Real Food

The much-anticipated Rally For Real Food was held on the steps of the Capitol in Austin, Texas earlier today.  The energetic crowd cheered a raft of passionate speakers including Ronda Rutledge (Executive Director, Sustainable Food Center), Eric Herm (Farmer, author of Son of a Farmer, Child of the Earth), Neil Carman, PH.D. (Sierra Club, Lone Star Chapter), Judith McGeary (Executive Director, Farm and Ranch Freedom Alliance) and Mike “The Health Ranger” Adams (Editor, Natural News) about the right to know what’s in our food.

Many thanks to Mike LaRocca of Beanitos for organizing this important event!  Thanks also to the sponsors, vendors, volunteers and attendees who helped make today’s rally a success.

Rally For Real Food
Rally For Real Food

(Click to see the photostream from today’s event. You are welcome to reuse these pictures, but please credit ediblearia.com for the original)

###

Over-fed and Malnourished?

The Standard American Diet (SAD for short) has been linked to the explosion of obesity, heart disease, diabetes and even some forms of cancer.  At the same time, many Americans are lacking in numerous critical nutrients including Vitamin D, Omega-3 and a wide range of minerals.

Heavily-processed foods are full of chemicals, salt, sugar and unhealthy fats and lacking in wholesome nourishment.  We are slowly starving even as we become fatter.  And more sick.

Recently, Michael Pollan (Food, Inc., Omnivore’s Dilemma) appeared on Oprah and discussed  many of these same issues.  We think that’s a fine place to start.

Please join with us in encouraging Oprah to continue the dialogue and effect real change.  Be part of the Real Food Revolution!

Simple Things

The more distance we put between ourselves and the profoundly broken industrial commercial food system the better.  The better for our health, for the local economy, the environment and our own pocketbooks.

Do what you can to become more self-reliant.  Turn off the TV, plant some herbs and vegetables, take a class about food preservation.  Learn to cook.  With practice, these things become second nature.

Consider today’s lunch..  homemade sauerkraut frittered in pastured butter, onions and peppers from the garden, locally made sausage, homemade fermented mustard..

100_2564
Real. Simple. Lunch.

What have you been eating for lunch all these years?  Is it time for a change?

This post is part of the Real Food Wednesdays Blog Carnival


Bookmark and Share

Let’s Get Well

ad5 “Daisie Adelle Davis (25 February 1904 – 31 May 1974), popularly known as Adelle Davis, was an American pioneer in the fledgling field of nutrition during the mid-20th century. She advocated whole unprocessed foods, criticized food additives, and claimed that dietary supplements and other nutrients play a dominant role maintaining health, preventing disease, and restoring health after the onset of disease:

Research shows that diseases of almost every variety can be produced by an under-supply of various combinations of nutrients… [and] can be corrected when all nutrients are supplied, provided irreparable damage has not been done; and, still better, that these diseases can be prevented.

Davis is best known as the author of a series of books published in the United States between 1947 and 1965. One of her books, Let’s Have Healthy Children states that Davis prepared individual diets for more than 20,000 people who came to her or were referred to her by physicians during her years as a consultant. She was also well known for her scathing criticism of the food industry in the United States. In the early 1970s, she addressed the ninth annual convention of the “International Association of Cancer Victims and Friends” at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. After citing U.S. Department of Agriculture statistics about tens of millions of people in the United States suffering from afflictions such as arthritis, allergies, heart disease, and cancer, she stated, This is what’s happening to us, to America, because there is a $125 billion food industry who cares nothing about health.”  -wiki

Adelle Davis Foundation


Bookmark and Share

Giveaway: Nourishing Traditions, Wild Fermentation

We have a winner!

Congratulations, Katie @ Kitchen Stewardship! Please send your shipping info to “ren AT ediblearia DOT com” and UPS should be ringing your doorbell in a couple of days.

Thank you all for participating, and be sure to check back soon for details on the next giveaway!

ps  I’d love to hear any ideas you might have for the next giveaway.  Thanks, everyone!

Unfortunately, fermented foods have largely disappeared from the western diet, much to the detriment of our health and economy. For fermented foods are a powerful aid to digestion and a protection against disease; and because fermentation is, by nature, an artisanal process, the disappearance of fermented foods has hastened the centralization and industrialization of our food supply, to the detriment of small farms and local economies.

So wrote Sally Fallon, author of Nourishing Traditions in the forward to Sandor Katz’ Wild Fermentation.

Fallon concludes by saying “Wild Fermentation represents not only an effort to bring back from oblivion these treasured processes, but also a road map to a better world, a world of healthy people and equitable economies, a world that especially values those iconoclastic, free-thinking individuals—so often labeled misfits—uniquely qualified to perform the alchemy of fermented foods.”

Fallon and Katz have both had a huge impact on the way that I  eat.  Indeed, it is their/your/our good old ways and modern science that underlay much of what I try to share here from day to day.  I know, some days are better than others, right?

OK, here’s the deal.  I feel strongly enough about the healing and nourishing power of traditional foods (that which Michael Pollan describes as food that our great grandmothers would recognize) that I’m going to send a copy of either Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions or Katz’ Wild Fermentation to one of you.  But first, you have to go on a little scavenger hunt.  Nothing too involved, but enough to let me know that your interest is sincere.  Cool?

To participate, just go spend some time looking around at either http://www.westonaprice.org/ or http://www.wildfermentation.com/, then come back here and tell me (using the comment section below) something that you want everyone to know about fermentation.  Dig around- there’s a lot of information out there!

I’ll choose one eligible entry at random, and ship the book to the winner at  any U.S. (only, sorry) address.  Contest ends in 1 week.

This post is part of the Real Food Wednesdays Blog Carnival