Farmageddon the Documentary

“How much longer should we defer to a governmental agency that has consistently failed to perform its duties?  The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is charged with protecting the American food supply, yet not a week goes by without another food-related health scare seizing headlines across the nation:  listeria in pasteurized milk;  spinach contaminated with E. coli; and potentially unsafe meat from “downer” cattle (animals which are sick or injured and unable to stand).”

“These outbreaks are the results of decades of USDA policy decisions which favor corporations and industrial agriculture over small family farms and local production.  Intensive animal and crop operations can lead to sick animals and tainted vegetables entering the food chain, and regulations which would prevent these incidents are often overlooked when corporate interests are at stake.” –Linda Faillace

[Vimeo 16513455]

http://farmageddonmovie.com/

A film by by Kristin Canty

Featuring Joel Salatin, Jackie Stowers, Mark McAfee, Linda Faillace and Eric Wagoner

Farmageddon
123 Street Ave.
Somerville, MA 02144

Blueberry Cream Scones with Honey-Lemon Curd

Drop scones made from sprouted wheat, fresh cream, cultured butter & pastured eggs, blueberries, wildflower honey and freshly-squeezed lemon juice..

Blueberry Cream Scones with Honey-Lemon Curd

For the Scones (adapted from a recipe by Mark Bittman)

1 cup organic sprouted wheat flour, plus more as needed
1 cup unbleached organic all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1 tablespoon aluminum-free baking powder
1 1/2 tablespoons local, raw honey
5 tablespoons pastured butter, cold
3 pastured eggs
3/4 cup fresh heavy cream
1/2 cup fresh blueberries, rinsed and picked over (substitute frozen blueberries in the off season)

Mix the dry ingredients together in a bowl.  Cut the chilled butter into the flour, ensuring that it is thoroughly combined. Beat 2 eggs with the cream, then stir into the flour.  Fold in blueberries.

Turn the dough onto a floured surface and gently knead until barely sticky.

Drop heaping tablespoons of mixture onto a greased baking sheet. Beat the remaining egg with with a scant amount of water and brush the top of the dough.  Bake in a 350 degree oven until it passes the toothpick test, about 12 minutes.

Allow to cool slightly before serving with honey-lemon curd.

For the Honey-Lemon Curd (recipe by Dede Sampson)

5 large pastured egg yolks
1 large pastured egg
2/3 cup freshly-squeezed Meyer lemon juice
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons wildflower honey
4 tablespoons pastured butter, cut into 8 pieces

Crème fraîche for serving

In a medium heatproof bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the whole egg, the lemon juice, 1 teaspoon of the lemon zest and the honey. In a medium saucepan, bring 1 inch of water to a boil. Set the bowl with the lemon mixture over the boiling water, reduce the heat to moderate and cook the mixture, whisking constantly, until thickened, about 7 minutes. Remove the bowl from the heat and whisk in the butter. Pass the curd through a fine-mesh strainer into a medium bowl. Wrap tightly and refrigerate at least 3 hours.

This post is part of A Moderate Life’s Tackling Bittman Recipe Hop !

Farmhouse Delivery Launches New Farm Membership Program

In an effort to create a sustainable revenue stream for local growers, Austin’s Farmhouse Delivery is launching a new seasonal farm membership.

Each bushel (available weekly or bi-weekly) will contain about 10 different types of all-local produce, including things like turnips, sweet potatoes, fennel, broccoli, greens, citrus and heirloom cauliflower, all delivered right to your door.

Running from November 2nd through December 21st, membership includes invitations to exclusive Rain Lily Farm events including demonstrations, dinners, cooking classes and more.

The deadline to sign up is October 30th, so better hurry!

Farmhouse Delivery Seasonal Bushel photo by Jody Horton, www.jodyhorton.com

Farmhouse Delivery Seasonal Bushel photo by Jody Horton, www.jodyhorton.com

Eat fresh, eat local – support your farmers!

Local Food

From Wikipedia

Local food (also regional food or food patriotism) or the local food movement is a “collaborative effort to build more locally based, self-reliant food economies – one in which sustainable food production, processing, distribution, and consumption is integrated to enhance the economic, environmental and social health of a particular place” and is considered to be a part of the broader sustainability movement. It is part of the concept of local purchasing and local economies, a preference to buy locally produced goods and services. Those who prefer to eat locally grown/produced food sometimes call themselves “localvores” or locavores.