Grilled Cheese Soup

Simmering vegetable stock, sourdough croûtons, fresh basil, scallions, Roma tomatoes and raw cheeses..

Grilled Cheese Soup

Grilled Cheese Soup

This recipe is a riff on The Moosewood Collective’s Italian Bread & Cheese Soup

For the stock

Roast such vegetables as you have available.  At a minimum, try to include celery, onions, carrots, tomatoes and garlic.  Parsley root and celery root add extra flavor.

Place roasted vegetables into a clean pot and fill with cold, filtered water.  Bring to a rapid boil, then reduce heat and simmer until reduced in volume by 1/3 or more, about 2 hours.  Add a teaspoon each of turmeric and paprika for color if you like. Strain and keep hot.

Tear wild yeast sourdough into irregular pieces and sauté in pastured butter until crisp and golden brown.  Place in the center of a deep dinner plate.

Add diced Roma tomatoes, thinly sliced scallions, Italian parsley and fresh basil.

Add shredded cheeses.  I’m using raw cheddar and Grana Padano.

Pour hot vegetable stock over the top and garnish with additional minced herbs.  Season with a little coarse seal salt and freshly-ground black pepper.


Dancing Mushroom Shiromiso


Saveur

Known as the Hen of the Woods mushroom in North America, the Maitake (dancing mushroom) is revered for its anti-cancer properties and ability to regulate the body’s blood pressure and insulin levels.

Here’s a delicious way to load up on minerals, vitamins, protein and amino acids..

Maitake Miso

Dancing Mushroom Shiromiso

If not available locally, whole Maitake mushrooms can be ordered from Mountain Rose Herbs

Whole, dried organic Maitake (grifola frondosa)
Fresh scallions, sliced
White miso paste
Organic spinach powder
Homemade chicken bone broth, vegetable stock or filtered water
Low-sodium tamari
Dried organic celery root
Dried hijiki

Soak dried Maitake in filtered hot (not boiling) water for 20 minutes.  Set re-hydrated mushroom aside to drain.  Reserve soaking liquid.

Drizzle mushroom with clarified butter, sprinkle with pepper and spinach powder and roast in a 350 degree oven until golden brown (about 25 minutes).  The mushroom should be slightly crispy on the edges.

Meanwhile, bring reserved soaking liquid and chicken stock to a rapid boil and cook until reduced in volume by 1/3.

Reduce heat and add tamari (be sure to use traditionally-fermented tamari that doesn’t contain hydrolyzed protein) celery root, scallions and hijiki (a wild brown sea vegetable).  Simmer for 5 minutes.

Remove broth from heat and stir in white miso paste.

Ladle broth into a bowl or deep plate then place the roasted Maitake on top.


Sprouted Black Quinoa with Roasted Red Pepper Purée and Salsa Cruda

Posted in support of Meatless Monday..

“Quinoa (KEEN-wah), the ancient grain of the Incas, has been cultivated in the Andean highlands of South America for over 7000 years.

It was of great nutritional importance in pre-Columbian Andean civilizations, being secondary only to the potato, and was followed in importance by maize. In contemporary times, this crop has become highly appreciated for its nutritional value, as its protein content is very high (12%–18%), making it a healthful choice for vegetarians and vegans.

Quinoa has a light, fluffy texture when cooked, and its mild, slightly nutty flavor makes it an alternative to white rice or couscous.”

With the addition of fresh, raw and roasted vegetables, this whole-food dish is a nutritionally complete, satisfying meal..

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Sprouted Black Quinoa with Roasted Red Pepper Purée and Salsa Cruda

For 2 servings

1/2 cup black quinoa* soaked overnight in 1/2 cup filtered water
1 red bell pepper, seeded
2-3 plum tomatoes
2 scallions
2 cloves garlic
2 green chilies, seeded
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1/2 teaspoon cracked coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
extra virgin olive oil

*Black quinoa is available in Austin at Wheatsville Co-op

Thoroughly rinse the quinoa and gently boil in 1/2 cup filtered water (1 cup if un-soaked) until tender, about 15 minutes.  Set aside.

Meanwhile, split, seed and roast 1 large red bell pepper and 2 small green chilies (adjust quantity according to your taste).  Roasting introduces a mild smokiness and adds complexity to the flavor.  Set aside.

Chop scallions, garlic, chilies, parsley and 1/2 of the tomatoes (this is the salsa cruda) and toss with quinoa and olive oil.  Allow to stand 10 minutes to combine flavors, then season with coriander seeds, salt and pepper.

Puree the red peppers in a food processor with 1 peeled and seeded plum tomato and a tablespoon of olive oil. Season lightly with salt and pepper and strain if desired.

Ladle pepper puree on a plate with a mound of quinoa.  Serve with a field green salad if desired.

Unlike wheat or rice (which are low in lysine), quinoa contains a balanced set of essential amino acids for humans, making it an unusually complete protein source. It is a good source of dietary fiber and phosphorus and is high in magnesium and iron. Quinoa is gluten-free and considered easy to digest. Because of all these characteristics, quinoa is being considered a possible crop in NASA’s Controlled Ecological Life Support System for long-duration manned spaceflights.

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Sprouted Black Quinoa with Roasted Red Pepper Purée and Salsa Cruda

Posted in support of Meatless Monday..

“Quinoa (KEEN-wah), the ancient grain of the Incas, has been cultivated in the Andean highlands of South America for over 7000 years.

It was of great nutritional importance in pre-Columbian Andean civilizations, being secondary only to the potato, and was followed in importance by maize. In contemporary times, this crop has become highly appreciated for its nutritional value, as its protein content is very high (12%–18%), making it a healthful choice for vegetarians and vegans.

Quinoa has a light, fluffy texture when cooked, and its mild, slightly nutty flavor makes it an alternative to white rice or couscous.”

With the addition of fresh, raw and roasted vegetables, this whole-food dish is a nutritionally complete, satisfying meal..

100_2348

Sprouted Black Quinoa with Roasted Red Pepper Purée and Salsa Cruda

For 2 servings

1/2 cup black quinoa* soaked overnight in 1/2 cup filtered water
1 red bell pepper, seeded
2-3 plum tomatoes
2 scallions
2 cloves garlic
2 green chilies, seeded
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1/2 teaspoon cracked coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
extra virgin olive oil

*Black quinoa is available in Austin at Wheatsville Co-op

Thoroughly rinse the quinoa and gently boil in 1/2 cup filtered water (1 cup if un-soaked) until tender, about 15 minutes.  Set aside.

Meanwhile, split, seed and roast 1 large red bell pepper and 2 small green chilies (adjust quantity according to your taste).  Roasting introduces a mild smokiness and adds complexity to the flavor.  Set aside.

Chop scallions, garlic, chilies, parsley and 1/2 of the tomatoes (this is the salsa cruda) and toss with quinoa and olive oil.  Allow to stand 10 minutes to combine flavors, then season with coriander seeds, salt and pepper.

Puree the red peppers in a food processor with 1 peeled and seeded plum tomato and a tablespoon of olive oil. Season lightly with salt and pepper and strain if desired.

Ladle pepper puree on a plate with a mound of quinoa.  Serve with a field green salad if desired.

Unlike wheat or rice (which are low in lysine), quinoa contains a balanced set of essential amino acids for humans, making it an unusually complete protein source. It is a good source of dietary fiber and phosphorus and is high in magnesium and iron. Quinoa is gluten-free and considered easy to digest. Because of all these characteristics, quinoa is being considered a possible crop in NASA’s Controlled Ecological Life Support System for long-duration manned spaceflights.

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Orange Ginger Salmon

Orange ginger salmon with black bean garlic udon..

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Marinate wild Alaskan salmon in ponzu shōyu (citrus-based soy sauce) with slices of soft crystallized ginger and fresh orange pieces and juice for no more than 1 hour.

Preheat a heavy skillet over medium heat for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, blanch, shock, drain and set aside fresh udon noodles.

In a second skillet, sauté sliced scallion and slivers of red bell pepper in a tablespoon of peanut oil.  Add julienned orange peel, sesame seeds and coriander.  A 2 tablespoons of black bean garlic sauce and stir to combine.

Lightly oil then sear the salmon skin side up until rare, then turn and spoon marinade over the top and allow to bubble until medium rare, about 2-3 minutes.

Toss reserved noodles in black bean sauce and use as a bed to place the salmon on.  Dust with shichimi tōgarashi (ground red chili pepper with nori and hemp).