Tag Archives: meatless monday

Filei Piccanti al Pomodoro

I don’t eat pasta very much these days (I’m trying to cut down on the carbs), so when I do, I want it to count.  This hand-rolled Italian semolina pasta with fiery red chili and homemade roasted tomato sauce with fresh herbs fits the bill quite nicely..

Filei Piccanti al Pomodoro

For the Pomodoro Sauce

8 ripe red tomatoes, cored, roasted and skinned
2/3 cup yellow onion, finely diced
3-4 cloves fresh garlic, slivered
2 tablespoons raw olive oil, plus more if needed
1/4 cup (loosely packed) whole purple basil leaves, dried
1/4 cup (loosely packed) fresh herbs such as oregano and green basil
sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper to taste

Heat the olive oil in a heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-low heat.  Add the onions and garlic and cook, stirring frequently, until the garlic has “melted” and the onions Oven-roasted tomatoeshave all but disappeared, about 20 minutes.  Drizzle in additional olive oil if needed to keep the vegetables moist while cooking, taking care to prevent browning.

Crush the tomatoes by hand into the pan with the vegetables.  Crumble the purple basil into the tomatoes and stir to combine.  Allow mixture to boil for a moment, then partially cover and reduce heat to low.  Simmer, stirring often, until most of the water has evaporated, about 30 minutes. The sauce should be very thick.

Cook the pasta according to package instructions, cutting the time by 2 or 3 minutes.  Stir enough of the boiling pasta water into the tomato sauce to thin it to a spoon-able consistency, then quickly add the pasta and herbs to the pan.  Stir and simmer for the remaining 2-3 minutes until the pasta is finished.

Season the dish with sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper to taste, then turn out into individual bowls.  Lightly drizzle with raw olive oil and top with a little sharp cheese, if desired and serve immediately.

This post is part of Meatless Monday, a non-profit initiative of The Monday Campaigns,
in association with the Johns Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health

Rajmah (Vegetarian Kidney Bean Curry)

Dried kidney beans are picked over and soaked overnight, cooked, drained and simmered with fire-roasted tomatoes, onions, garlic, ginger, chiles and toasted whole spices.  Served over a bed of Indian-spiced, aged basmati rice, this dish totally rocks the taste buds while remaining inexpensive and easy to prepare..

Rajmah (Vegetarian Kidney Bean Curry)

For the Rajmah, I adapted a recipe from Smitten Kitchen, while the cardamom and cinnamon-scented rice preparation comes from Simply Recipes.  In the latter case, you can simply substitute olive oil for the ghee to suit your vegan needs.  Both recipes are seriously delicious just as they are.

This post is part of Meatless Monday, a non-profit initiative of The Monday Campaigns,
in association with the Johns Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health

(Vegetarian) Israeli Couscous with Fresh Vegetables, Harissa and Mint

Two kinds of couscous (pearled and Israeli whole wheat) are sautéed in olive oil, then simmered in a rich, homemade vegetable stock flavored with harissa and fresh mint and tossed with a medley of lightly-cooked, seasonal vegetables..

Israeli Couscous with Fresh Vegetables, Harissa and Mint

1/2 cup pearled couscous
1/2 cup Israeli whole wheat couscous (Ptitim)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
2 cups homemade vegetable stock, boiling
1 to 2 teaspoons harissa
1 small bunch fresh mint, chopped
2 carrots, cut into small, oblique shapes, about 1/2 cup
1-2 large spring onions, including green tops, bias-cut, about 1/2 cup
1/2 cup fresh green peas
1 fresh tomato, chopped
1 or 2 cloves garlic, minced
sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper

Sauté couscous in olive oil for 2 minutes, stirring constantly to coat evenly.  Add boiling vegetable stock and harissa, reduce to a simmer and cook until nearly all the liquid has been absorbed, about 8 minutes.  Stir in peas and mint, cover and remove from heat.

Sauté carrots, garlic and onions in olive oil,  stirring frequently until just softened.  Stir in tomatoes and cook 1 minute longer.

Stir cooked vegetables into warm couscous and serve garnished with fresh mint.  Offer harissa on the side if desired.

This post is part of Meatless Monday, a non-profit initiative of The Monday Campaigns,
in association with the Johns Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health

Native Vegetable Stew w/Cumin-Roasted Sweet Potatoes, Wild Onions and Fresh Chiles

Inspired by a recipe from the Moosewood Restaurant, this vegetarian dish features cumin-roasted sweet potatoes with assorted fresh chiles, green garlic and wild onions in a light vegetable stock-based sauce with tomatoes, cilantro and a bit of chipotle salsa.

Vitamins A & C and fiber- rich, naturally sweet, smokey and dense, with a moderate heat.  Serve with flat-bread or Anasazi beans..

Native Vegetable Stew /Cumin-Roasted Sweet Potatoes, Wild Onions & Fresh Chiles

The Moosewood Restaurant was founded by Mollie Katzen and others in 1973 in downtown Ithaca, New York, a university town in New York State which is the location of Cornell University and Ithaca College.

Known for its vegetarian cooking, Moosewood was named one of the thirteen most influential restaurants of the 20th Century by Bon Appetit magazine.  It won a James Beard Foundation “American Classic” Award in 2000. –Wikipedia

This post is part of Meatless Monday, a non-profit initiative of The Monday Campaigns,
in association with the Johns Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health

Vegan Aloo Gobi

Fresh cauliflower, plum tomatoes, green chiles, sweet potatoes and ginger are sauteed and seasoned with toasted coriander, cumin, turmeric, brown mustard seeds, ajwain and nigella seeds.  Garnished with fresh cilantro and served with warm onion and garlic naan..

Vegan Aloo Gobi

Aloo gobi (Hindi: आलू गोभी is a dry Indian and Pakistani cuisine dish made with potatoes (aloo), cauliflower (gob(h)i) and Indian spices.  It is yellowish in color due to the use of turmeric, and occasionally contains kalonji and curry leaves.  Other common ingredients include garlic, ginger, onion, coriander stalks, tomato, peas, and cumin. A number of variations and similar dishes exist, but the name remains the same.

This post is part of Meatless Monday!

Meatless Monday is a non-profit initiative of The Monday Campaigns, in association with the Johns Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Roasted Broccoli, Potato and Vintage Cheddar Cheese Soup

Fresh broccoli, heirloom garlic and Yukon gold potatoes are lightly buttered, seasoned with sea salt and cracked black pepper and roasted until golden brown.  The vegetables are then simmered in a rich base of homemade vegetable stock with vintage yellow and Jasper Hill clothbound cheddar cheeses (in Austin, try Antonelli’s Cheese Shop in the Hyde Park neighborhood).  Seasoned with Piment d’Espelette and just a few red chili pepper flakes..

Roasted Broccoli, Potato and Vintage Cheddar Cheese Soup

The Espelette pepper (French: Piment d’Espelette; Basque: Ezpeletako biperra) is a variety of chili pepper that is cultivated in the French commune of Espelette, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, traditionally the northern territory of the Basque people.

Originally from Mexico and to a lesser extent South America, Piment d’Espelette was introduced into France from the New World during the 16th century.  After first being used medicinally, it subsequently became popular for preparing condiments and for the conservation of meat and ham.

Espelette peppers are harvested in the late summer, with characteristic festoons of peppers are hung to dry on balconies and house walls throughout the communes. –Wikipedia

This post is part of Meatless Monday, a non-profit initiative of The Monday Campaigns
in association with the Johns Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health.