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Austin Food Blogger Alliance 2nd Annual Colossal Curry Cook­-Off

AUSTIN FOOD BLOGGER ALLIANCE SPICES UP THE CITY WITH SECOND ANNUAL CURRY COOK-OFF

Colossal Curry Cook-­Off Brings the Community Together to Raise Funds for Local Non-­Profit

AUSTIN, TX (April 5, 2017):​ The Austin Food Blogger Alliance (AFBA) announces their second annual Colossal Curry Cook­-Off fundraiser, occurring Saturday, April 22, 2017, from 2:00pm­-4:00pm at Shangri­-La.
 
Open to the public, this irresistibly spicy event will give Austinites the chance to vie for the coveted title of Curry Champion of Austin. Everyone from professional chefs to home cooking enthusiasts are encouraged to enter the cook-off and compete for prizes by emailing AFBA at cookoff@austinfoodbloggers.org by April 10, 2017. All curry styles from across the globe are welcome – entries will be judged based on taste.
 
For those who aren’t ready to flex their own curry cooking muscle, tickets to the Colossal Curry Cook­-Off are on sale now on EventBrite and cost $20 per person, or $25 at the door the day of event (venue restrictions limit attendees to 21+ only). Guests of the cook­-off will enjoy tastes of all the curry recipes and tunes from DJ Dolomike, and will cast their votes for the People’s Choice award.
 
“Everyone in the Austin Food Blogger Alliance is so excited for this cook­-off,” says Kristin Sheppard, President of AFBA. “We think this will be such a fun event for the community and a unique way to raise some funds for a quintessentially Austin non­profit. We appreciate our local friends’ support however they can provide it, whether it’s buying tickets to attend the cook­-off or entering as a contestant and showcasing their curry-­cooking chops!”
 
Sponsored by Shangri-La, American Lamb Board, Savory Spice Shop, Austin Gourmet Popcorn, Wheatsville Co-op, Central Market and Uchi, the Colossal Curry Cook-­Off is sure to be a flavorful afternoon no one will forget. To enter or get more information on this event, please email AFBA at cookoff@austinfoodbloggers.org.

 

About Austin Food Blogger Alliance:

The Austin Food Blogger Alliance (AFBA) seeks to support a local membership of food bloggers and the community through educational initiatives, social events, philanthropic endeavors, and by upholding a commonly shared code of ethics. Formed in 2011, AFBA has over 100 active members blogging on a range of topics, including:

∙ Cooking or baking
∙ Restaurant reviews
∙ Beverages
∙ Special diets, gluten ­free, vegan, vegetarian
∙ Food photography
∙ Food trailers
∙ Farming and gardening
∙ Sustainability

The Austin Food Blogger Alliance is an organization of local food bloggers that seeks to support one another and the community through educational initiatives, social events, philanthropic endeavors, and a shared code of ethics. AFBA is a 501(c)(7) nonprofit organization led by an all-volunteer Board of Directors. Benefits of membership include:

∙ Invitations to members­ only events, classes, and informational panels
∙ Volunteer opportunities within the Austin food community
. Opportunity to contribute to the AFBA City Guide, which averages about 15,000 views per month
∙ Blog promotion via the AFBA website, Twitter feed, and Facebook page
∙ Access to the members ­only Facebook group
∙ Monthly newsletter with news, event announcements, and job opportunities
∙ The opportunity to connect with more than 100 like­minded Austin food writers

. …and more!
 
To learn more about what the food­ loving group is up to, follow AFBA on Facebook (Austin Food Blogger Alliance) Twitter (@atxfoodblogs) or Instagram (@atxfoodblogs).

Best Dang Smokerless Smoked Brisket Ever

Best Dang Smokerless Smoked Brisket Ever

Best Damn Smokerless Smoked BrisketBrisket is a pitmaster’s mainstay. But let’s face it, even at the best places, it’s often the least interesting option on the menu—dry, bland, blah. Tired of the ho-hum stuff (and never willing to shy away from a challenge), our kitchen crew set out to make a better brisket, with juicy, smoky meat and a sticky, satisfying bark. Just to up the ante, they decided to develop it without the aid of a smoker, instead testing recipes indoors and using liquid smoke and nitrites to evoke a smoky flavor and signature pink ring at the edge of the meat—both hallmarks of first-rate ’cue.

This recipe calls for one of our favorite secret ingredients, Bragg’s Liquid Aminos, a gluten-free, non-GMO certified soy sauce alternative.. Liquid Aminos 16 oz. 16 Ounces

The upshot for you, hungry meat fiends: the best dang barbecue brisket you’ll ever make. What’s more, you can make it in the climate-controlled comfort of your own kitchen. You don’t need a smoker, and you don’t need a lot of space. Heck, you don’t even have to have any prior barbecuing experience to make this thing happen. What you do need: a few easy-to-find ingredients and a big ol’ hunk of meat. Grab some carnivorous buddies—you’re gonna want to show this one off.

Get the recipe at chefsteps.com

Smokerless Smoked Brisket | Sous Vide Recipe

No smoker? No problem. Master indoor barbecue with this flavor-packed sous vide brisket.

The sugar conspiracy

Robert Lustig is a paediatric endocrinologist at the University of California who specialises in the treatment of childhood obesity. A 90-minute talk he gave in 2009, titled Sugar: The Bitter Truth, has now been viewed more than six million times on YouTube. In it, Lustig argues forcefully that fructose, a form of sugar ubiquitous in modern diets, is a “poison” culpable for America’s obesity epidemic.

A year or so before the video was posted, Lustig gave a similar talk to a conference of biochemists in Adelaide, Australia. Afterwards, a scientist in the audience approached him. Surely, the man said, you’ve read Yudkin. Lustig shook his head. John Yudkin, said the scientist, was a British professor of nutrition who had sounded the alarm on sugar back in 1972, in a book called Pure, White, and Deadly.

“If only a small fraction of what we know about the effects of sugar were to be revealed in relation to any other material used as a food additive,” wrote Yudkin, “that material would promptly be banned.” The book did well, but Yudkin paid a high price for it. Prominent nutritionists combined with the food industry to destroy his reputation, and his career never recovered. He died, in 1995, a disappointed, largely forgotten man.

But it was not impossible to foresee that the vilification of fat might be an error. Energy from food comes to us in three forms: fat, carbohydrate, and protein. Since the proportion of energy we get from protein tends to stay stable, whatever our diet, a low-fat diet effectively means a high-carbohydrate diet. The most versatile and palatable carbohydrate is sugar, which John Yudkin had already circled in red. In 1974, the UK medical journal, the Lancet, sounded a warning about the possible consequences of recommending reductions in dietary fat: “The cure should not be worse than the disease.”

In 1980, after long consultation with some of America’s most senior nutrition scientists, the US government issued its first Dietary Guidelines. The guidelines shaped the diets of hundreds of millions of people. Doctors base their advice on them, food companies develop products to comply with them. Their influence extends beyond the US. In 1983, the UK government issued advice that closely followed the American example.

The most prominent recommendation of both governments was to cut back on saturated fats and cholesterol (this was the first time that the public had been advised to eat less of something, rather than enough of everything). Consumers dutifully obeyed. We replaced steak and sausages with pasta and rice, butter with margarine and vegetable oils, eggs with muesli, and milk with low-fat milk or orange juice. But instead of becoming healthier, we grew fatter and sicker.

The sugar conspiracy | Ian Leslie

The Long Read: In 1972, a British scientist sounded the alarm that sugar – and not fat – was the greatest danger to our health. But his findings were ridiculed and his reputation ruined. How did the world’s top nutrition scientists get it so wrong for so long?

Vegan Demi-Glace

An unctuous, flavor-packed demi-glace that’s wheat free, gluten free, and vegetarian. Did we say vegetarian? We should probably mention that it’s in fact vegan—with no dairy at all. And yet, you won’t believe its rich, satisfying taste and texture. Oh, and hey, you can make this stuff in less than two hours!

Click below for recipe and instructional video..

Umami-Bomb Vegetarian Demi-Glace | Recipe