Buffalo-Roasted Cauliflower, Buttermilk Bleu Cheese Dressing

Fresh cauliflower is cut into florets, misted with olive oil and seasoned with sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper.  Slow-roasted until tender-crisp and brown, then dressed with Buffalo sauce (equal proportions of Frank’s Hot Sauce and melted butter, with a dash of vinegar) and returned to the oven for a few more minutes to glaze.

Served hot with a cooling combination of crumbled bleu cheese, buttermilk, shaved celery, sour cream, chives, parsley and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice..

“Cauliflower is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Protein, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Magnesium and Phosphorus, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Potassium and Manganese.”  –NutritionData

Smoked Beef Brisket

Hickory-smoked local, pastured beef brisket with chili BBQ sauce..

Smoked Beef Brisket

Smoked Beef Brisket

Trim a beef brisket of most fat and all connective tissue.  Rinse and pat dry.

Liberally coat all sides with your favorite dry rub (I use smoked chili powder), cover and refrigerate 4 hours or overnight.

Place seasoned brisket in a hickory chip-impregnated smoker bag along with 1/4 cup of filtered water and some coarsely chopped celery, yellow onions and carrots.

Seal the bag and place in a 500 degree oven for 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 350 and continue to cook until meat is tender, about 2 hours for a 3-pound brisket.

Remove brisket from bag and allow to rest on a cutting board for at least 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, pour the vegetables and juices from the bag into a blender and pulse until smooth.  Add tomato paste to thicken, a little molasses for sheen and chili base for flavor.

Carve brisket against the grain into 1/4 inch slices and serve with chili BBQ sauce.


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Early Fall Peppers

Wednesday evening means Farmer’s Market in Austin, and September means peppers!  Hot peppers, sweet peppers, short ones, long ones, round ones and everything in between.  Here’s a small sample that includes jalapeños, hot cherry, Russian heirloom and assorted sweets.

Since this is way more than I can eat in the next week, I’m going to use use two methods to set some aside. Start by halving, seeding, rinsing and chopping your peppers (size and shape are up to you).

The 1st batch is left as is and double-bagged for the freezer.  The second batch is sealed in an airtight glass container with olive oil, salt and vinegar. Recipe-ready, it will live in the refrigerator for up to 3 months.