Duck Leg Demi-Confit, Wild Rice, Root Vegetables and Grand Marnier Demi-Glace (favorite)

Traditional French confit (kahn-FEE) of duck takes up to 8 weeks to make; its flavor is unparalleled.  This recipe uses similar techniques, approximating the flavor of traditional confit in just 24 hours (hence duck leg demi-confit).  Served with Grand Marnier demi-glace, root vegetables and wild rice..

The day before, rinse duck legs and pat dry.  Place on top of a 1/8 inch bed of kosher salt in a non-reactive dish.  Add a dozen bruised garlic cloves to the dish.  Season duck with ground bay leaf, thyme, cloves, nutmeg, ginger, allspice, cinnamon, corriander and cumin.  Cover duck completely with kosher salt, cover dish and refrigerate for 18-24 hours.

2 hours before dinner, remove the duck and garlic from the refrigerater and brush away all of the salt.

Brown the duck legs in rendered duck fat, remove to a side dish and pour off (and reserve) all but 2 tablespoons of fat.  Sauté celery, leeks, carrots, thyme and garlic in same pan until browned, about 10 minutes.

Return duck to pan and add enough homemade chicken stock to cover all but the tops of the duck.  The goal is to braise the duck until tender, but still have a crispy skin.  Season liberally with fresh cracked pepper and place in 400 degree oven for 30 minutes.

Reduce oven to 300 degrees and remove pan.  Add wild rice and more stock if neccessary.  Baste duck with reserved fat and return to oven for 1 hour.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the duck and vegetables to a side dish and keep warm.  Degalze pan with Grand Marnier, add chicken stock and reduce quickly.  Finish with demi-glace.

To serve, arrange duck on top of vegetable rice mixture, dress with demi-glace and garnish with slivered scallions and orange pieces.

0 thoughts on “Duck Leg Demi-Confit, Wild Rice, Root Vegetables and Grand Marnier Demi-Glace (favorite)

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    • Its a quick, light cure that actually helps prevent moisture loss. Moisture is drawn from the muscle to the surface of the skin, where it melts a little of the salt and draws the seasoning back into the muscle. Unsealed, the moisture would evaporate, resulting in a tough, dry dish.

  3. OK, you’ll have to make your recipes printable LOL!! Just got back from the WAPF conference and am finally ready to tackle your recipe! Unfortunately, no pastured duck to be found locally, will have to thaw out “natural” duckling” and see how it goes. Thank you!

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