Category Archives: Cereals, Grains, Legumes

The Perfect Loaf


Modern farming practices are killing us

Glyphosate is killing usAn alarming new study, accepted for publication in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology last month, indicates that glyphosate, the world’s most widely used herbicide due to its widespread use in genetically engineered agriculture, is capable of driving estrogen receptor mediated breast cancer cell proliferation within the infinitesimal parts per trillion concentration range.

The study, titled, “Glyphosate induces human breast cancer cells growth via estrogen receptors,” compared the effect of glyphosate on hormone-dependent and hormone-independent breast cancer cell lines, finding that glyphosate stimulates hormone-dependent cancer cell lines in what the study authors describe as “low and environmentally relevant concentrations.”


Monsanto Roundup is the most important causal factor in the Celiac disease/gluten intolerance epidemic.

Toxic Wheat

Common wheat harvest protocol in the United States is to drench the wheat fields with Roundup several days before the combine harvesters work through the fields as the practice allows for an earlier, easier and bigger harvest.

Pre-harvest application of the herbicide Roundup or other herbicides containing the deadly active ingredient glyphosate to wheat and barley as a desiccant was suggested as early as 1980. It has since become routine over the past 15 years and is used as a drying agent 7-10 days before harvest within the conventional farming community.

Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia (low red blood cells) and depression (low mood disorder). It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup®, is the most important causal factor in this epidemic.

Also see

White Bean and Kale Soup with Spanish Chorizo

Cannellini beans simmered in homemade chicken stock with olive oil, cooking chorizo,  garlic, onions, red peppers, smoked paprika, saffron, kale and fresh rosemary..

Crispy Cajun-Roasted Okra withTomatoes, Onions and Peppers

Perhaps most familiar to Americans as a component of gumbo, this West African plant happens to be a high-fiber, fat and cholesterol-free source of vitamin C, folate, calcium and potassium.  High in antioxidants, this health food is also popular in weight loss diets.

When cooked, okra can be quite mucilaginous (gooey), which some people find off-putting. In response, this recipe results in a crispy, non-gooey dish of delicious goodness..

For the Rice

1 cup germinated brown rice, rinsed and drained
1-1/2 tablespoons pastured butter
2-1/2 cups homemade chicken or vegetable stock
1-1/2 teaspoons celery seed
2 tablespoons fresh oregano
sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper

Heat the butter in a heavy-bottomed saucepan until bubbling, then add the rice.  Stir to coat each grain with fat, then cook and stir until lightly browned, about 2-3 minutes.

Add the stock and celery seed and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat, cover and simmer until tender, about 45 minutes.  Remove from heat, add oregano and season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and hold for service.

For the Tomatoes, Onions and Peppers

1-1/2 cups fresh heirloom tomatoes, cut into large chunks
3/4 cup yellow onion, cut into 1/2 to 3/4-inch pieces
1/2 cup fresh banana peppers, trimmed and sliced
olive oil for misting
sea salt and smoked black pepper

Line an oven-proof pan with foil or parchment paper.

Arrange vegetables around pan and mist with olive oil. Season with salt and smoked black pepper.

Place pan in 425 degree oven and roast until slightly blackened, about 30 minutes.

For the Okra

3/4 pound fresh okra, washed and trimmed
1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning (typically paprika, garlic, black pepper, red pepper, caraway, dill and cumin)
sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper
olive oil for misting
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice, reserved

Arrange the okra on a rack set inside a cookie sheet. Lightly mist the okra with olive oil and dust liberally with Cajun seasoning.

Season with salt and pepper, then place the pan in a 425 degree oven  and roast until tips and edges begin to brown, about 15 minutes.

Remove okra from roasting pan and add to the tomato mixture.  Toss and turn, return pan to oven and roast another 7-8 minutes.

To Serve

Spoon rice into serving bowls, then top with roasted vegetables.  Drizzle with lemon and pan juices and serve immediately.

Vegan Black Lentils and Chana Dal, Chili-Fried Green Beans

Onions, fresh garlic and ginger are quickly fried in olive oil along with fennel and mustard seeds, coriander, turmeric root powder, fresh curry leaves and Tellicherry black pepper. 

Rinsed urad dal (split black lentils) and chana dal (split black chickpeas) are added to the pan and simmered for about an hour and a half in homemade vegetable stock.  Chopped fresh tomatoes are added during the last 20 minutes, with chopped fresh cilantro added just before service.

The dish is topped with oil-fried fresh green beans and red chilies, with some of the hot oil drizzled over the top.

Low in cholesterol and high in protein, this easy, inexpensive dish is full of flavor and very satisfying..

For the Vegetable Stock (adapted from a recipe Gourmet magazine)

1/2 lb portabella mushrooms, caps and stems cut into 1-inch pieces
1 lb shallots, left unpeeled, quartered
1 lb carrots, cut into 2-inch pieces
2 red bell peppers, cut into 1-inch pieces
6 fresh flat-leaf parsley sprigs (including stems)
5 fresh thyme sprigs
4 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup dry white wine
2 fresh bay laurel leaves
1 cup fresh tomatoes, diced
2 qt filtered water

Preheat oven to 425°F.

Toss together mushrooms, shallots, carrots, bell peppers, parsley and thyme sprigs, garlic, and oil in a large flameproof roasting pan. Roast in middle of oven, turning occasionally, until vegetables are golden, 30 to 40 minutes.

Transfer vegetables with slotted spoon to a tall narrow 6-quart stockpot. Set roasting pan across 2 burners, then add wine and deglaze pan by boiling over moderate heat, stirring and scraping up brown bits, 2 minutes. Transfer to stockpot and add bay leaves, tomatoes, and water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, 45 minutes. Pour through a large fine sieve into a large bowl, pressing on and discarding solids, then season with salt and pepper. Skim off fat.  Use within 1 week or freeze up to 3 months.