Save the Perennials…and Save the Community

Perennials prepare the soil of community for future growth. I read an article yesterday that demonstrates the importance of perennial & old growth: “This man is cloning old-growth redwoods and planting them in safe places”. From the article:

By cloning and replanting them in places where they once thrived but were lost, he is not only increasing their numbers but planting them in locations where they have a better chance of longevity. And the result is two-fold: Save the trees and save the planet (for humankind, at least, the planet will go on with or without us, but you know what I mean). Redwood trees are among the most effective carbon sequestration tools in the world, notes Moving the Giants, “Milarch takes part in a global effort to use one of nature’s most impressive achievements to re-chart a positive course for humanity.”

We can take his concept and create a case for the importance of identifying & supporting the long-term ‘investors’ in local communities. (A group in which I include myself).

For example, Austin is at risk of losing our identity as a sustainable ecosystem because the perennials–those who hold the history and have contributed both money & much more to the ‘soil’ in which the ‘new’ Austin has grown–are uprooting and finding new places to “get involved, stay curious, mentor others, [be the] passionate, compassionate, creative, confident, collaborative, global-minded, risk takers who continue to push up against [the] growing edge and know how to hustle” [source: Meet the Perennials]

We ‘perennials’ have come to Austin–and stayed–for reasons beyond money.  Our investment of time is the most valuable and vital for the future of the community. However, without acknowledgement and support for our contributions, we can easily leave and reroot elsewhere, something that’s happening daily. The myth of Austin is powerful, but it’s wearing thin. It is up to us to rewrite the story together.

Sources:

Leave a Reply