Joe Mercola: Celebrating 23 years of promoting quackery and antivaccine misinformation

He promotes antivaccine pseudoscience, the rankest of cancer quackery (e.g., the idea that cancer is a fungus and that baking soda can cure it), and pseudoscience and quackery of every imaginable variety, all while presenting himself as “moderate” and “reasonable” compared to those “real crazies,” like Mike Adams. It’s not just his website and social media activity, though.

Joe Mercola: Celebrating 23 years of promoting quackery and antivaccine misinformation – RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE

“Dr.” Joe Mercola just celebrated 23 years of his website. It’s actually been 23 years of promoting quackery and antivaccine misinformation, culminating in a lot of COVID-19 disinformation. Joseph Mercola, DO has been a frequent topic of discussion on this blog over the last 15 years. The reason is simple.

Fareground Announces Opening Date

Fareground Announces Opening Date
Austin’s First Food Hall to Open in January

AUSTIN – December 14, 2017 – Named by Money Inc. as one of the seven most anticipated food halls in the world, Fareground is slated to open on January 18, 2018. Housed within Cousins Properties’ urban plaza at 111 Congress Avenue and designed by the award-winning Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, the site is curated and managed by ELM Restaurant Group (24 Diner, Easy Tiger Bake Shop & Beer Garden, Italic and Irene’s). Six operators, representing the city’s top culinary talent and a wide range of cuisines, are participating: Antonelli’s Cheese Shop, Contigo, Dai Due, Easy Tiger, Emmer & Rye and Komé/Daruma Ramen.

“It’s so exciting to be a part of a global dining movement and have the opportunity to showcase some of Austin’s best-loved chefs & restaurateurs,” says Bob Gillett, one of ELM’s founders. “I’m blown away by the passion, vision and camaraderie that went into this project, and can’t wait for opening day!”

FAREGROUND VENDORS 

Antonelli’s Cheese Shop

Named one of the top cheese shops in America by Travel & Leisure, Antonelli’s Cheese will offer a curated selection of cut-to-order cheese, charcuterie and artisanal pairings currently available at their popular Hyde Park storefront. Owners John and Kendall Antonelli will also incorporate their favorite cheeses in a variety of hot and cold items, including themed cheese plates, cheese & mac bowls, grilled cheese selections, tomato soup, salads, gourmet sandwiches and seasonal specialties. Nearby downtown businesses take note: They’ll also be offering cheese trays and catering options. And yes, there will be complimentary cheese tasting on site!

Contigo Fareground

Contigo’s chef Andrew Wiseheart (three-time nominee for Food & Wine’s People’s Best New Chef: Southwest) and co-owner Ben Edgerton will bring their casual interpretation of Texas cuisine and strong Southern hospitality to Fareground. Fans of the laidback eastside shop will be thrilled to see favorites such as the Contigo burger and crispy green beans on the menu. Exclusive to the downtown shop is locally sourced, natural chicken cooked on a rotisserie – perfect for dining in or an easy grab & go meal when paired with their housemade sauces and a wide selection of hearty salads and sides.

 Dai Due Taquería

Hyperlocal Dai Due – headed by chef Jesse Griffiths (a James Beard Award finalist) and co-owner Tamara Mayfield – has evolved over the last decade from on-farm supper clubs to the farmers’ markets to a brick-and-mortar restaurant & butcher shop. The team partnered with chef Gabe Erales for new concept Dai Due Taquería, which will feature tacos, tortas and molletes filled with Texas game (including wild boar al pastor, bison picadillo and venison barbacoa), Gulf seafood and innovative veggie combos (such as beet longaniza). Tortillas and masa will be made in house with Mexican heirloom corn milled on site. Don’t miss the authentic salsas and agua frescas made with locally sourced fruits and vegetables.

Easy Tiger

Easy Tiger – named one of America’s Best Beer Gardens by Food & Wine – pairs house-cured meats and sausages made by Andrew Curren (two-time nominee for Food & Wine’s People’s Best New Chef) with artisanal breads baked by head doughpuncher David Norman. Start your day with an espresso and pastry (including pain au chocolat, spiced Tiger Claw or cinnamon knot), tuck into a pastrami or corned beef on rye for lunch, snack on a German-style pretzel & addictive beer cheese over Happy Hour or indulge in a classic bratwurst in a pretzel bun for dinner. Be sure to pick up a loaf of freshly baked bread to take home.

Henbit

The team behind Emmer & Rye (crowned one of America’s Best New Restaurants by Bon Appétit) will launch Henbit at Fareground. At this new concept, chefs Kevin Fink (Food & Wine Best New Chef 2016), Tavel Bristol-Joseph and Page Pressley will continue their commitment to local sourcing, seasonality and working closely with farmers. Menus will span all dayparts and include healthy, approachable items. For breakfast, try the red fife kolaches with chorizo, cheese & local chiles or white Sonora wheat breakfast burritos. Later in the day, nosh on redtail shrimp poke with crispy rice salad or avocado & spaghetti squash salad with burnt pecan dressing. Partner Rand Egbert will lead the beverage program with offerings such as superfood lattes (try the matcha with lavender syrup or spiced golden milk) and Cascara and Yaupon teas.

Ni-Komé

Husband & wife chef/owners Takehiro & Kayo Asazu melded elements of Komé Sushi Kitchen (named one of the Best New Sushi Restaurants in America by Bon Appétit) and sister shop Daruma Ramen (downtown’s first ramen shop) to create new concept Ni-Komé. The sushi bar will feature combination sushi lunches (nigiri selection plus a roll) and Komé’s signature rolls, such as the spooky roll (spicy tuna, avocado, salmon and go-go sauce). The ramen menu will include Daruma’s famous Marudori (whole chicken broth) and vegan options.

The Fareground property also includes two bars that will be overseen by ELM’s Beverage Director, Master Sommelier Craig Collins. Within the food hall proper, the counter-service bar will offer 24 draft beers, wine and sake, as well as housemade draft cocktails specifically created to complement the diverse vendor offerings. The street-level exterior bar will open later in the spring and offer beer, wine and cocktails.

Once it’s up and running, Fareground’s hours of operation will be 7 am to 10 pm Monday through Friday and 9 am to 10 pm on the weekend. Contigo, Dai Due Taquería, Easy Tiger and Henbit will open with breakfast service; Antonelli’s Cheese and Ni-Komé will open at lunchtime.

Web: https://faregroundaustin.com/ @faregroundatx

 

The sugar conspiracy

Robert Lustig is a paediatric endocrinologist at the University of California who specialises in the treatment of childhood obesity. A 90-minute talk he gave in 2009, titled Sugar: The Bitter Truth, has now been viewed more than six million times on YouTube. In it, Lustig argues forcefully that fructose, a form of sugar ubiquitous in modern diets, is a “poison” culpable for America’s obesity epidemic.

A year or so before the video was posted, Lustig gave a similar talk to a conference of biochemists in Adelaide, Australia. Afterwards, a scientist in the audience approached him. Surely, the man said, you’ve read Yudkin. Lustig shook his head. John Yudkin, said the scientist, was a British professor of nutrition who had sounded the alarm on sugar back in 1972, in a book called Pure, White, and Deadly.

“If only a small fraction of what we know about the effects of sugar were to be revealed in relation to any other material used as a food additive,” wrote Yudkin, “that material would promptly be banned.” The book did well, but Yudkin paid a high price for it. Prominent nutritionists combined with the food industry to destroy his reputation, and his career never recovered. He died, in 1995, a disappointed, largely forgotten man.

But it was not impossible to foresee that the vilification of fat might be an error. Energy from food comes to us in three forms: fat, carbohydrate, and protein. Since the proportion of energy we get from protein tends to stay stable, whatever our diet, a low-fat diet effectively means a high-carbohydrate diet. The most versatile and palatable carbohydrate is sugar, which John Yudkin had already circled in red. In 1974, the UK medical journal, the Lancet, sounded a warning about the possible consequences of recommending reductions in dietary fat: “The cure should not be worse than the disease.”

In 1980, after long consultation with some of America’s most senior nutrition scientists, the US government issued its first Dietary Guidelines. The guidelines shaped the diets of hundreds of millions of people. Doctors base their advice on them, food companies develop products to comply with them. Their influence extends beyond the US. In 1983, the UK government issued advice that closely followed the American example.

The most prominent recommendation of both governments was to cut back on saturated fats and cholesterol (this was the first time that the public had been advised to eat less of something, rather than enough of everything). Consumers dutifully obeyed. We replaced steak and sausages with pasta and rice, butter with margarine and vegetable oils, eggs with muesli, and milk with low-fat milk or orange juice. But instead of becoming healthier, we grew fatter and sicker.

The sugar conspiracy | Ian Leslie

The Long Read: In 1972, a British scientist sounded the alarm that sugar – and not fat – was the greatest danger to our health. But his findings were ridiculed and his reputation ruined. How did the world’s top nutrition scientists get it so wrong for so long?

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Seeds of Time

Seeds of Time

10,000 years ago the biggest revolution in human history occurred: we became agrarians. We ceased hunting and gathering and began to farm, breeding and domesticating plants that have resulted in the crops we eat today. But the genetic diversity of these domesticated crops, which were developed over millennia, is vanishing today. And the consequences of this loss could be dire.

As the production of high yielding, uniform varieties has increased, diversity has declined. For example, in U.S. vegetable crops we now have less than seven percent of the diversity that existed just a century ago. We are confronted with the global pressures of feeding a growing population, in a time when staple crops face new threats from disease and changing climates.

Crop diversity pioneer Cary Fowler travels the world, educating the public about the dire consequences of our inaction. Along with his team at The Global Crop Diversity Trust in Rome, Cary struggles to re-invent a global food system so that it can, in his words: “last forever.” Cary aims to safeguard the last place that much of our diversity is left in tact: in the world’s vulnerable gene banks.

http://www.seedsoftimemovie.com/