Category Archives: Traditional Food

The Big Fat Surprise

Listen to an intro by the author

Paperback: 496 pages
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (January 6, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1451624433
ISBN-13: 978-1451624434

 

The Big Fat SurpriseIn The Big Fat Surprise, investigative journalist Nina Teicholz reveals the unthinkable: that everything we thought we knew about dietary fat is wrong. She documents how the low-fat nutrition advice of the past sixty years has amounted to a vast uncontrolled experiment on the entire population, with disastrous consequences for our health.

For decades, we have been told that the best possible diet involves cutting back on fat, especially saturated fat, and that if we are not getting healthier or thinner it must be because we are not trying hard enough. But what if the low-fat diet is itself the problem? What if the very foods we’ve been denying ourselves—the creamy cheeses, the sizzling steaks—are themselves the key to reversing the epidemics of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease?

In this captivating, vibrant, and convincing narrative, based on a nine-year-long investigation, Teicholz shows how the misinformation about saturated fats took hold in the scientific community and the public imagination, and how recent findings have overturned these beliefs. She explains why the Mediterranean Diet is not the healthiest, and how we might be replacing trans fats with something even worse. This startling history demonstrates how nutrition science has gotten it so wrong: how overzealous researchers, through a combination of ego, bias, and premature institutional consensus, have allowed dangerous misrepresentations to become dietary dogma.

With eye-opening scientific rigor, The Big Fat Surprise upends the conventional wisdom about all fats with the groundbreaking claim that more, not less, dietary fat—including saturated fat—is what leads to better health and wellness. Science shows that we have been needlessly avoiding meat, cheese, whole milk, and eggs for decades and that we can now, guilt-free, welcome these delicious foods back into our lives.

Digging In

“In the seed and the soil, we find the answers to every one of the crises we face. The crises of violence and war. The crises of hunger and disease. The crisis of the destruction of democracy.” – Vandana Shiva

Click to learn more

Watch the Exclusive Worldwide Premiere of Origins

Find out who’s hijacking your health…
and how to reclaim it!

Origins (movie)

About the Filmmakers

Pedram Shojai, OMD, is the founder of Well.Org, the editor of BeMore! Magazine, the author of Rise and Shine, and the producer and director of the documentary films “Vitality” and “Origins.” It was when he ran a large medical practice treating patients with the same lifestyle-induced ailments again and again, that Dr. Shojai began his mission — to help people understand the intrinsic connection between their lifestyle, their health and the vitality of our planet. He works to preserve our natural world and wake us all up to our fullest potential.

Mark van Wijk is a filmmaker based in Cape Town, South Africa. He studied Photography at Port Elizabeth Technikon, specialising in travel. After 4 years of travel he then made a natural progression onto film and television.

“The great outdoors gives me energy – the earth and nature inspires me in my work and in my life! Respect for all is my only rule! People need to understand that they are actually a part of nature and my dream is for my work to bridge the divide that civilization and technology have created”

The message in the film – Origins – kept me inspired throughout the entire project. I am so happy and privileged to have been able to make this film with Pedram and I believe it carries a message that all of us need to understand and live towards!

Help Save Austin’s Sprindale Farm

via Edible Austin

Dear Friends,

I’m here with an update on Springdale Farm. We have spent almost two years working with the City of Austin staff, Planning Commission, and City Council to:

1) re-define the Urban Farm Ordinance, and
2) make sure we are compliant with all new codes and ordinances.

Unfortunately, we also continue to face opposition and your help could mean the difference between Springdale Farm continuing or being closed down.

Our goal here is simple. We want to be able to keep farming on our land.

Diversifying our income base is what all farmers have to do. Urban Farms don’t receive government subsidies, nor have we asked for any. We just want the city to grant us the proper permits to continue to host occasional events on the farm. Some places call it agri-tourism. We call it making a living, and as a commercially zoned property, we are simply asking for permission to do what other commercially zoned properties are allowed to do.

And here’s what we need from you.

Please email our city council or our zoning case manager and let them know that you support Springdale Farm. Let these public officials know that hosting weddings and supper clubs are a part of the culture of Austin that makes our city great. If you’ve had the opportunity to eat at Eden East at Springdale Farm, please let city council members and the case manager know that you appreciate Eden East as well.

Your action of expressing gratitude for Springdale Farm and the activities that happen here could make the difference in whether Springdale Farm stays in existence or not.

Please also check out http://www.springdalefarmaid.org to join us on the farm on September 28 for a lovely Sip and Stroll with 17 of Austin’s top local chefs, local libations, farm games, and silent auction.

Thank you, and let’s keep growing together,

Glenn and Paula

Tamatem Ma’Amrine

Tamatem Ma’Amrine is a Moroccan dish of roasted tomatoes stuffed with albacore, capers, olives and preserved lemon..

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Tamatem Ma'Amrine (click to enlarge)

Adapted from a recipe by Claudia Roden

Carve a lid out of the tomatoes and scoop out the insides as you would a jack-o’-lantern.  Don’t let the walls get too thin, or the tomatoes will split while roasting. Turn the tomatoes upside down and let the water drain.

Meanwhile, flake apart US Pacific troll or line-caught albacore and toss gently in extra virgin olive oil with bits of roasted red pepper, coarsely chopped capers and black olives, thinly slivered preserved lemon and chopped flat-leaf parsley.

Season tuna mixture with cracked coriander, fennel and white sesame seeds and stuff into the tomatoes.

Drizzle with a little more olive oil and season with sea salt and cracked pepper.  Roast in a 375 degree oven until slightly blackened, perhaps 30 minutes.

Serve warm or refrigerate and serve cold; a crisp salad goes well in either case.

This post is part of Food Renegade’s Fight Back Fridays

© Monterey Bay Aquarium
© Monterey Bay Aquarium

Seafood Watch: Tuna, Albacore

Vandana Shiva on the Problem with Genetically-Modified Seeds

 
Bill Moyers talks to scientist and philosopher Vandana Shiva, who’s become a rock star in the global battle over genetically modified seeds. These seeds — considered “intellectual property” by the big companies who own the patents — are globally marketed to monopolize food production and profits. Opponents challenge the safety of genetically modified seeds, claiming they also harm the environment, are more costly, and leave local farmers deep in debt as well as dependent on suppliers. Shiva, who founded a movement in India to promote native seeds, links genetic tinkering to problems in our ecology, economy, and humanity, and sees this as the latest battleground in the war on Planet Earth.