Category Archives: Traditional Food

Help Save Austin’s Sprindale Farm

via Edible Austin

Dear Friends,

I’m here with an update on Springdale Farm. We have spent almost two years working with the City of Austin staff, Planning Commission, and City Council to:

1) re-define the Urban Farm Ordinance, and
2) make sure we are compliant with all new codes and ordinances.

Unfortunately, we also continue to face opposition and your help could mean the difference between Springdale Farm continuing or being closed down.

Our goal here is simple. We want to be able to keep farming on our land.

Diversifying our income base is what all farmers have to do. Urban Farms don’t receive government subsidies, nor have we asked for any. We just want the city to grant us the proper permits to continue to host occasional events on the farm. Some places call it agri-tourism. We call it making a living, and as a commercially zoned property, we are simply asking for permission to do what other commercially zoned properties are allowed to do.

And here’s what we need from you.

Please email our city council or our zoning case manager and let them know that you support Springdale Farm. Let these public officials know that hosting weddings and supper clubs are a part of the culture of Austin that makes our city great. If you’ve had the opportunity to eat at Eden East at Springdale Farm, please let city council members and the case manager know that you appreciate Eden East as well.

Your action of expressing gratitude for Springdale Farm and the activities that happen here could make the difference in whether Springdale Farm stays in existence or not.

Please also check out http://www.springdalefarmaid.org to join us on the farm on September 28 for a lovely Sip and Stroll with 17 of Austin’s top local chefs, local libations, farm games, and silent auction.

Thank you, and let’s keep growing together,

Glenn and Paula

Tamatem Ma’Amrine

Tamatem Ma’Amrine is a Moroccan dish of roasted tomatoes stuffed with albacore, capers, olives and preserved lemon..

103_2296
Tamatem Ma'Amrine (click to enlarge)

Adapted from a recipe by Claudia Roden

Carve a lid out of the tomatoes and scoop out the insides as you would a jack-o’-lantern.  Don’t let the walls get too thin, or the tomatoes will split while roasting. Turn the tomatoes upside down and let the water drain.

Meanwhile, flake apart US Pacific troll or line-caught albacore and toss gently in extra virgin olive oil with bits of roasted red pepper, coarsely chopped capers and black olives, thinly slivered preserved lemon and chopped flat-leaf parsley.

Season tuna mixture with cracked coriander, fennel and white sesame seeds and stuff into the tomatoes.

Drizzle with a little more olive oil and season with sea salt and cracked pepper.  Roast in a 375 degree oven until slightly blackened, perhaps 30 minutes.

Serve warm or refrigerate and serve cold; a crisp salad goes well in either case.

This post is part of Food Renegade’s Fight Back Fridays

© Monterey Bay Aquarium
© Monterey Bay Aquarium

Seafood Watch: Tuna, Albacore

Vandana Shiva on the Problem with Genetically-Modified Seeds

 
Bill Moyers talks to scientist and philosopher Vandana Shiva, who’s become a rock star in the global battle over genetically modified seeds. These seeds — considered “intellectual property” by the big companies who own the patents — are globally marketed to monopolize food production and profits. Opponents challenge the safety of genetically modified seeds, claiming they also harm the environment, are more costly, and leave local farmers deep in debt as well as dependent on suppliers. Shiva, who founded a movement in India to promote native seeds, links genetic tinkering to problems in our ecology, economy, and humanity, and sees this as the latest battleground in the war on Planet Earth.

Farm-City, State

Farm-City, StateFarm-City, State asks the question, ‘What if an entire city could feed itself?’

Come join us as we explore Austin’s local food scene and see how it will grow into the future. How do you feed an entire city? These people have an answer and the feature film will explore scalability, distribution, consumer education and the future of food in Austin, Texas.

Learn about the characters in the local food scene that have changed the face of food in Austin over the past 6 years. Watch the journey of one local urban farmer that starts in a backyard and grows to a larger piece of land in East Austin. Enjoy the adventures of a family of 5 that sources local food for 30 days – and how they like or dislike it?

This dynamic adventure will help you understand where Austin fits into the local food scene that is sweeping the nation.

farmcitystate.com

Wrong Mine, Wrong Place

Tens of millions of salmon are beginning to return to the streams, rivers and headwaters of the Bristol Bay Fisheries Reserve in Alaska. They are in the final stage of completing a life cycle that began years earlier in the very same location and as long as the spawning grounds are intact and protected, these runs will continue to thrive forever.

 
But this vast, pristine habitat—home to one of the most important salmon fisheries in the world— is facing a catastrophic threat. Given massive discoveries of gold and copper deep below the surface of Bristol Bay’s headwaters, a foreign mining conglomerate called the Pebble Partnership plans to build North America’s largest open pit mine. Should toxic mining waste from the Pebble Mine find its way into the watershed, the effects would prove catastrophic to salmon and the entire ecosystem.

Learn more..

Healing The Planet Through Agriculture

“We must continually bear in mind that the human body is the tool of the spirit…. We can ask ourselves whether we make our bodies unfit for the execution of the intentions, aspirations, and impulses of our lives if we become bound by and dependent upon our bodies through an unsuitable diet.” ~ Rudolf Steiner

 

Biodynamic agriculture considers the farm or garden to be a self-contained organism that exists in a larger framework of a living, dynamic cosmos. The aim is to work with those energies within the farm system in order to increase the health and vitality of the soil, the crops, the farm animals, even the farmer. But biodynamics was never just focused on agricultural techniques. It was conceived of as a new way of thinking about the connection between farming, nutrition, and our spiritual nature. Steiner gave much thought to the effect of foods on the whole human being- the physical, psychological, and the spiritual. He pointed out, way back in the 1920’s, that people “in our modern age” have increasingly lost the instinct for what is good or bad for them to eat. Steiner explained that in addition to the physical substances food provides for our nutrition, it also needs to provide vital forces for the development of our higher spiritual capacities, and acknowledged this to be a factor reducing people’s ability to make strides with a more spiritual nature. ~ Elizabeth Candelario (Co-Director, Demeter Assoc.)